Why is the statute of limitations deadline so important? If you try to file your claim after the deadline has passed, the health care provider you're trying to sue us sure to make a motion to dismiss the case, and the court is certain to grant it -- unless there's a reason to extend the deadline as it applies to your case, including the exceptions we've discussed in this article.
Suing a doctor for negligence requires much more than just filing a lawsuit in a Florida court. One of the prerequisites to filing a lawsuit against the doctor requires that you must first provide him or her with notice, indicating that you intend to file a lawsuit in the near future. A 90-day waiting period follows, during which the doctor may reject the claim outright, offer to settle the case, or ask to submit the case to arbitration.
I thought my first encounter with my new psychiatrist was traumatic but after reading everyone's comments I don't feel like I was abused as badly as so many of you were. I am doing research because this doctor was so rude and unprofessional that I actually was traumatized when I left his office after our first session. After reading and doing some research I have found that unfortunately I can not sue him for medical malpractice but you can bet I am going to report him to every medical organization I can. I have already gone to the hospital and spoken to upper management and they have forced him to prescribe my medication in the correct quantity after he lied to me in session and told me he could only prescribe a 30 day quantity. How am I supposed to make it through the other 2 months before my next appointment with him if I only have a 30 day supply? Idiot. He was irritated with me because even though he had my chart (my regular doctor abruptly left her practice 8 days before my scheduled appointment with her) and I was shuffled to this clown and they sent all my records to him (or so they said). He kept asking ME which of the meds listed on my chart were my psych meds and got irritated when I told him I didn't know. That's when I started to get nervous. If he was a real doctor, how is it he couldn't pick out the psych meds from everything else on my list? He asked me why I was taking so many anti-depressants. I thought to myself--that's a stupid question-I am the patient, I didn't prescribe them so how would I be able to even begin to answer that question? He explained that giving anti-depressants to a bipolar was like giving them rocket fuel. Then he snickered and said that maybe I had pissed off my last doctor( I suppose as an explanation for why she was overmedicating me and according to his opinion after seeing me for all of 15 minutes that I was too manic) As he perused my chart he saw something he didn't like and he said, "Shit!" I thought ok, that wasn't very professional. As he proceeded to ask questions, when I answered them (or I should say tried to answer them) he would interrupt me when he felt he'd gotten the information he needed and he'd say, " ok, that's all I need to know". He cut me off mid-sentence repeatedly as if I was wasting his time and he wanted me to just shut up once he got what he wanted for his purposes. One of my conditions is bipolar and somehow the question of being highly sexual came up and he said, "Oh, so you were promiscuous." I have never had anyone use that kind of terminology to describe that particular symptom. I have read books, magazines, done on-line research about bipolar ever since my diagnosis and I have not encountered that wording to describe the condition. I was shocked to hear a doctor use that term. I felt like he had called me a whore. At least that's how I felt. He asked me about working with other doctors and I shared that I had one doctor who never shared or gave any feedback and he laughed and said, "Well, then you won't like me, because I don't give feedback either." I thought to myself, how is it funny that a psychiatrist doesn't give a patient any kind of feedback at all? How is he going to now how my meds are working or if they aren't, and how am I supposed to know the same thing if he never interacts with me?" The icing on the cake was when he abruptly stopped speaking in the middle of his instructions about my meds and said, "OK, time's up, our session is over." I was so surprised I really had no idea what to say. I sat there for a minute trying to collect myself and to see if he was serious and he just kept staring at me, so I said,"Um, well, if you think it's not important to give me instructions on my meds, then I guess I have to leave since you are telling me to go." I was floundering at this point because I honestly had no idea what I was going to do. They tell you to take your meds, take your meds, take your meds, because it is so important that you stay on your regime once your doctor gets you started, and so many people with bipolar stop once they feel better, but I knew how wild my life had been before I was finally diagnosed so I am totally dedicated to staying on medications and here was my doctor kicking me out of his office without my meds. I was totally freaked out. Then he said, "No, I'm going to finish giving you your instructions, but I wanted to make a point of it that you were late and that now you are cutting into my next patient's time. I had been on time but I did stop at the desk to write my co-pay which took all of maybe 2 or 3 minutes. He finished his instructions to me and as I was leaving he said, "Remember, if you want respect, you have to give respect." And then he instructed me to be early to my next visit. I suppose to be sure that I didn't spend 3 minutes writing out my co-pay. I was so freaked out, I felt like a criminal for almost three days because I believed I had been so bad. Thank goodness, I've had several good doctors over the years, and as I processed it more and more I started to get angry. Really, really angry. I won't even go into the run around I got from the sorry excuse they have for a patient liason who was absolutely no help. As a matter of fact, after dealing with her, I was even angrier. I was torn between pursuing the matter further or just letting it go because I knew I was going to run out of meds in 30 days and then what? But this week after seeing my talk therapist and being able to compare my reactions to hers, I realized that HE was the one who had been wildly inappropriate and that he had been unprofessional, rude, and actually, just downright mean. I have no idea why people like that are even allowed to practice medicine. Especially the kind of medicine where they can really mess someone up with medication and with inappropriate or cruel behavior. So I drove to the hospital, demanded to see anyone who was not that excuse for a patient liason, got a printed copy of my patient's rights (which I did not know existed had I not seen them posted on the wall at the front desk when I went in that day) They called and I got to speak to someone in risk management (so apparently the patient liason person lied to me when she said she did not report to anyone and refused to let me have the corporate address and said they only people above her were the doctors and they would not want to speak to me about my issue)
Your attorney should also disclose “bad facts” in the opening statement.[20] A bad fact is anything the defense would want to bring to the jury’s attention because it makes the defense case much stronger. For example, your failure to follow your doctor’s prescribed treatment is a bad fact. By disclosing bad facts first, your attorney can take the sting out of them.
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As a nurse and a patient (of medical and psychiatric docs) I think that if a doc lies when obtaining informed consent, that is clearly NOT ok - not sure if that is malpractice and/or a licensure issue. I think asking about complications rates and experience with a particular procedure are absolutely appropriate questions, for any MD. When you read articles for consumers about how to get good care, these are questions you are encouraged to ask!!! If the doc has had little experience and/or complications, doc can have prepared a statement explaining why he feels adequately prepared in this case, what is different about this case in terms of risk of complications(such as 'other pt. had another serious illness that increased risk, etc.)


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In many jurisdictions, a medical malpractice lawsuit is initiated officially by the filing and service of a summons and complaint. The parties subsequently engage in discovery,"[2] a process through which documents such as medical records are exchanged, and depositions are taken by parties involved in the lawsuit. A deposition involves the taking of statements made under oath about the case. Certain conversations are not discoverable due to issues of privilege, a legal protection against discovery,[4] but most conversations between the parties and witnesses are discoverable.

Somewhere between 210,000 and 400,000 Americans die each year due to a medical error (James 2013); it is now the third leading cause of death in the United States (Makary 2016). Many more sustain injuries that leave them with lifelong disabilities. Moreover, a recent national survey revealed that 21% of Americans have personally experienced a medical error, and 31% have been involved in the care of a family member or friend who did. As discussed above, tort reform measures may be effective in limiting the number and success of malpractice lawsuits, but don’t necessarily address the underlying issue of the malpractice epidemic in America.
There are a number of different ways that improper delay in the provision of medical care could result in harm to a patient -- the delay may have made your condition worse, it may have negated the possibility that certain treatment could be administered, it could have blunted the effectiveness of a certain treatment method, or it could have unnecessarily prolonged or intensified your pain and discomfort.

Doctor negligence claims can be complex as it can often be difficult to show that the injury or illness you are suffering from has been caused or exacerbated by the negligence of your GP. Your solicitor will arrange for you to be assessed by an independent medical expert who will assess your injuries and/or illness and will advise on whether the symptoms you are experiencing have been caused by the negligent actions (or inactions) of your GP.
When you go to a hospital, you expect that the medical care you receive will make you better. But with multiple health care professionals in hospitals involved in your treatment, the risk of medical error increases. Sometimes, inadequate patient safety procedures cause hospitals to commit serious medical errors and patients are seriously or fatally injured. Our hospital malpractice attorneys are here for you.
Examples of doctor negligence involve patients' complaints not being taken seriously enough, illnesses being incorrectly diagnosed, GPs refusing to carry out blood tests, incorrect or inappropriate medication being administered, incorrect doses of medication being prescribed, referrals to specialist consultants not being made in time or at all and follow up appointments/treatments not been carried out quickly enough . They can also include serious illnesses (such as cancer) being misdiagnosed as something less serious, broken or fractured bones going undiagnosed due to lack of referral for x-ray, failing to follow-up on a patient’s complaints and concerns, failing to correctly identify an illness or injury and treating an injury or illness in a manner which leads to complications and/or further injury or illness.
Have you been injured due to military hospital medical malpractice? Under United States tort law, federal employees are not personally liable for most torts they commit in the course of their work. Instead, you can only hold those employees responsible using a special law called the Federal Tort Claims Act. This includes Army, Navy, and Air Force hospitals.In some respects, FTCA cases are quite different from ordinary tort cases. In such a case, the injured party may not file a lawsuit against the government until he or she has exhausted all administrative remedies. The injured party must first file an administrative claim with the proper agency of the United States government within a limited amount of time. Whitehurst, Harkness, Brees, Cheng, Alsaffar, Higginbotham, and Jacob, PLLC, has experience in representing injured parties at the administrative claim stage and throughout trial in federal courts all over the United States.
While most people think of medical malpractice claims only in terms of the clear errors, like amputating the wrong leg, or dropping a junior mint into someone’s body during surgery, it is generally much more nuanced. When a doctor fails to make an appropriate diagnosis, prescribes the wrong medication, or fails to communicate important information, malpractice claims may be possible in these situations as well.

A 2011 study in the New England Journal of Medicine reported that 75% of physicians in "low-risk" specialties and virtually 100% of physicians in "high-risk" specialties could expect to face a malpractice claim during their careers. However, the authors also noted that the vast majority of malpractice claims did not lead to any indemnity payments.[22]

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Your safety and health should always be your first priority in any medical decision you make.  If you have already been injured by a doctor’s negligence or mistake, report the problem to your doctor immediately and seek immediate medical treatment from a different physician.  If you identify problems early, another physician may be able to improve the medical error.
A person who alleges negligent medical malpractice must prove four elements: (1) a duty of care was owed by the physician; (2) the physician violated the applicable standard of care; (3) the person suffered a compensable injury; and (4) the injury was caused in fact and proximately caused by the substandard conduct. The burden of proving these elements is on the plaintiff in a malpractice lawsuit.
Of course, these questions get even more murky when talking about the legal system of a foreign country. Some nations may not recognize rights to sue by foreigners. Others may bog down in administrative red tape far thicker than anything found in an American court. Some estimate cases for malpractice brought in foreign nations could take 20 years or more to resolve. Worse yet, some nations may try to transfer jurisdiction back to the United States and the US may refuse to accept it, creating a legal back and forth leaving the parties in limbo.
The Syracuse medical malpractice lawyers of Michaels & Smolak have recovered millions of dollars for clients injured by medical malpractice and for other injuries to cover their medical bills, lost earnings, pain and suffering, and more. If you or a loved one has been a victim of medical malpractice, contact us for a free consultation with an experienced lawyer who can inform you of your legal rights and maximize your compensation.
Under the abrogation doctrine, while Congress cannot use its Article I powers to subject states to lawsuits in either federal courts, Seminole Tribe v. Florida, or a fortiori its own courts, Alden, supra, it can abrogate a state's sovereign immunity pursuant to the powers granted to it by §5 of the Fourteenth Amendment, and thus subject them to lawsuits. Seminole, supra; Fitzpatrick v. Bitzer. However:
Subsequent cases have held the Bivens theory of recovery applies to other claims under the various rights enumerated in the Constitution. (For decisions concerning redress of Fifth Amendment claims with Bivens actions, See Young v. Pierce, (DC Tex. 544 F.Supp. 1010) and Eight Amendment claims Mackey v. Indiana Hospital, (DC PA 562 F.Supp. 1251. [3]
In states using this second standard, courts ask whether a normal patient, with the same medical history and conditions as the plaintiff, would have changed his or her mind about the treatment if the risk was disclosed. Unlike states following the first standard, a doctor must also inform a patient of realistic alternative treatments, even if the doctor only recommends one treatment.
Somewhere between 210,000 and 400,000 Americans die each year due to a medical error (James 2013); it is now the third leading cause of death in the United States (Makary 2016). Many more sustain injuries that leave them with lifelong disabilities. Moreover, a recent national survey revealed that 21% of Americans have personally experienced a medical error, and 31% have been involved in the care of a family member or friend who did. As discussed above, tort reform measures may be effective in limiting the number and success of malpractice lawsuits, but don’t necessarily address the underlying issue of the malpractice epidemic in America.
Some state courts still use the Frye test that relies on scientific consensus to assess the admissibility of novel scientific evidence. Daubert expressly rejected the earlier federal rule's incorporation of the Frye test. (Daubert, 509 U.S. at 593-594) Expert testimony that would have passed the Frye test is now excluded under the more stringent requirements of Federal Rules of Evidence as construed by Daubert.
I haven’t touched on that question. It would make it painful for me. I would be moved to tears if that whole case revolved around just my testimony. I was on the stand so briefly. But cumulatively between what I said and the other testimony — it was never a level playing field for the plaintiff. People don’t recognize it. How the judges don’t recognize it and the system doesn’t recognize it is beyond me. It’s something I’m coming to grips with.

If you are considering a medical negligence claim and you are thinking of contacting Been Let Down to discuss your claim, we would first arrange a consultation over the telephone; this initial call is free, and there is no obligation to proceed. During this phase of the claims process, we will take the time to listen to the details of your claim in detail.


The next step is to prove that the defendant doctor breached the standard of care. What should the doctor have done, and what was actually done? For example, if the standard of care required the doctor to refer the patient to a specialist before terminating the doctor-patient relationship, failure to do so would constitute a breach of the standard of care. The expert's opinion comes into play at this stage as well, painting a picture of how the care provided was sub-standard under the circumstances.

The administration of anesthesia poses a high risk during a surgical procedure. This is the reason why anesthesiologists practice such a focused medicine. Anesthesia errors can lead to a brain injury or organ failures. Anesthesia errors can also lead to death via asphyxia or heart failure. In some cases, medication administered to a patient prior to a surgical procedure can affect the drugs used for anesthesia. An anesthesiologist must thoroughly examine the patient’s medical records before making a decision on the type or mixture of drugs to use to anesthetize the patient for surgery. A failure to do so can result in serious injury to the patient and this may be grounds for a negligence claim.


Another common form of physician negligence is surgical error. Like all types of medical malpractice, surgical error is dependent upon the standard of care. But unlike in diagnostic error cases, common surgical errors are often very easy to identify. Amputating the wrong leg, leaving surgical instruments inside a patient’s body, performing the wrong procedure, or performing a procedure without informed consent -- these types of errors constitute physician negligence and are often very east to spot. If your surgeon breached the standard of care and caused you harm, your surgeon was likely negligent.

In fact, filing a civil suit against your doctor does not even guarantee that he will be investigated. In order for your doctor to be investigated, a complaint would have to be filed against him with the New York State Department of Health. The Office of Professional Medical Conduct (“OPMC”) is responsible for investigating complaints about physicians, physician’s assistants, and specialist assistants. An investigation may lead to a formal hearing before a committee of the Board for Professional Medical Conduct.
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