Medical malpractice suits are usually filed in a state trial court, unless the case involves federal funding, a military medical facility, or or a Veteran’s Administration facility: then it would be filed in a federal district court. A claim may also be filed in a federal court if the parties involved are from different states, or if there was an accused violation of a fundamental constitutional right.
Medical malpractice cases almost always require medical experts to testify about the proper standard of care that should have been provided under the circumstances. These are often physicians who practice within the same type of medicine that the physician defendant practices in. These individuals are usually tasked with the responsibility of explaining that the defendant deviated from the standard of care and that this deviation resulted in the patient suffering the harm alleged in the complaint.

My son was diagnosed in his teens with ADHD Paranoid schizophrenia which he was prescribed rispiridone which stabilized his condition slightly but as an adult he couldn't tollorate the side affects any longer and his team (lol) changed it over 2 years ago, since then it's been a living hell. He has been in a psychotic state since and no one is helping him, he totally believes what he thinks is happening to him is real and he has no mental illness, teams (lol) have seen him periodically and he convinced them it is all real and walked away! Fuelling his beliefs although it has been proved by the police numerous times the GP blood tests and a&e visits that nothing is being put in his water supply food etc but yet he still TRUELY believes he's being targeted and drugged. I've tried and tried to tell his GP, rang the local mental health units and told them, rang his adolescent psychiatrist who was brilliant when he was a teen but did nothing as an adult as they are moving and he wouldn't work with them after the visit to his home to section him in which they left believing him, but to my son it is real he's delusional, psychotic, violent, demanding, they are ment to be professionals! I no longer live near my son due to health issues, spinal injuries, ms/me hemoplegic migraine amongst others, so my youngest son who lives 2 mins away from my eld

If you are considering a medical negligence claim and you are thinking of contacting Been Let Down to discuss your claim, we would first arrange a consultation over the telephone; this initial call is free, and there is no obligation to proceed. During this phase of the claims process, we will take the time to listen to the details of your claim in detail.

In the course of medical treatment, mistakes can be made that can further damage your health — or lead to new issues altogether. When these situations are caused by the medical negligence of health care providers, it is important that they are held accountable — not just so that those affected can be compensated, but so that the negligence is not repeated.

How do you plan to PROVE that the receptionist gave you the codes? As you say, it's a he-said/she said situation. What kind of evidence do you have that would make a court rule in your favor? If the receptionist, either because she's lying to protect her job or because she's honestly forgotten doing so, says she did not give them to you, what do you have that will prove her wrong?


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Similar to the errors in treatment discussed above, pharmaceutical errors can constitute medical negligence if the errors are in violation of the standard of care. If you’ve watched television long enough to reach a commercial break, you’ve likely seen commercials for prescription drugs that end with a litany of potentially dangerous side effects. When prescribed and used as directed, the benefits of use are thought to outweigh the potential dangers. But if your physician prescribes an inappropriate drug to treat your condition -- whether misdiagnosed or diagnosed correctly -- he or she has violated the standard of care and committed an act of negligence.

Wrong Diagnosis: The ER doctor gives you a diagnosis, but it turns out they have picked the wrong disease. While you are being treated for it, the real disease could progress, possibly causing a permanent injury. While an incorrect diagnosis could be a common mistake since many illnesses display similar side effects, if it resulted due to someone not doing their job properly, it is considered malpractice.


Expert witnesses must be qualified by the Court, based on the prospective experts qualifications and the standards set from legal precedent. To be qualified as an expert in a medical malpractice case, a person must have a sufficient knowledge, education, training, or experience regarding the specific issue before the court to qualify the expert to give a reliable opinion on a relevant issue.[14] The qualifications of the expert are not the deciding factors as to whether the individual will be qualified, although they are certainly important considerations. Expert testimony is not qualified "just because somebody with a diploma says it is so" (United States v. Ingham, 42 M.J. 218, 226 [A.C.M.R. 1995]). In addition to appropriate qualifications of the expert, the proposed testimony must meet certain criteria for reliability. In the United States, two models for evaluating the proposed testimony are used:
If you have been injured by someone acting on behalf of the Federal Government, you may be able to sue the Government under the FTCA.    Because suing the United States Government under the FTCA is trickier than suing a private entity or private citizen, you should retain an attorney who is experienced in handling these complex cases.  The FTCA attorneys at Suthers Law Firm have successfully represented individuals in medical malpractice and personal injury cases against the Government, and have the requisite experience and resources to take on the Government.  If you or a loved one has been injured at the hands of the Government, contact Suthers Law Firm for a free consultation.
When the provincial health insurance plans were first created in the 1960’s and 1970’s, the federal government paid for about half of the provincial plans’ costs.  This percentage fell by more than half in the 1990’s, but has gone back up somewhat in recent years.[4]  The provincial contributions to the plans are also mostly from general revenues.  However, the largest province, Ontario, and a couple of other provinces also impose a levy on employers to help pay for their programs.
The 18th and 19th centuries saw an ebb and flow between patients and physicians respective rights in the area of medical liability, alternating who held the upper hand. One of the first courses of action was defining the emerging concept of ‘standard' or 'duty of care.' Both standard of care and the logical foundation of ‘expert testimony' are derived from the notion that there is a professional custom. This means the standard of care a physician owes the patient is not necessarily defined by a common rationale or legal sensibility, but by what other physicians deem “customary” for their profession. Therefore, other medical professionals must agree that a defendant professional “contravened customary practice” in order to constitute legal transgression. This allowed medical professionals to set the legal standard for their own behavior. They were bound to a standard of care because they practiced a 'common calling' and possessed a supposed shared knowledge of best practices. In early British common law, this principle was contained in the 'rule of locality,' which held that physicians were bound to their self-set standard, but only by those professionals within their geographic region, or "locality." This has evolved, where modern law does not esteem geographic locality but requires that all medical professionals in the same practice area be bound to the same standard. Only a physician in the same practice area may judge that another professional has breached the standard of care in that profession. A 1769 lawsuit in England, Slater v. Baker set about defining the standard by which a physician's conduct could be measured and compared, while still enforcing the arbitrary requirement that a physician may only be found liable if a fellow physician from the defendant's same geographic region found that the standard of care was breached. The locality rule with regards to geography was eventually scrapped in Anglo-American law, but the locality of practice area remained intact.
Experience: All attorneys are not created equal. Many attorneys today work as general practice attorneys, meaning they handle all types of cases from criminal matters to civil suits. However, if you have experienced a case of medical negligence, it is important to have an attorney who specializes in medical malpractice. You do not want a lawyer whose first trial is going to be this case. Even attorneys who specialize in civil matters rarely go to court, as many of their cases settle without a trial. At The O’Keefe Firm, Stephen O’Keefe has had years of actual trial experience specializing in medical malpractice cases. Although your case may be resolved without stepping into the courtroom, you can be assured that Mr. O’Keefe has the trial experience necessary to fight for your rights in front of a jury.
If a doctor tells me that there is nothing wrong with me and said that he talked to another doctor that is treating me. When I know that he did not talk to the other doctor that is treating me, because the other doctor that is treating is going to do surgery for the same reason that I went to see the first doctor.I was being treated for something and went to a hospitial and that doctor tells me that there is nothing wrong with me, when the other doctor had done told me that I need surgery. He also told me that he talked to the other doctor that is treating me and that doctor told him that there was nothing wrong. when i talk to the doctor that is treating me that tells me that I need surgery I told that doctor I also went to the hospitial and seen another doctor and the doctor that is treating me did not know anything about it.
Even though your workers’ comp doctor is on the employer’s panel of physicians and paid by the workers comp insurance company, he or she still owes you a duty of care. He or she must provide acceptable care that meets the standards of what other health care providers in the field would provide. Any deviation from the appropriate standard of care and the workers’ comp doctor may be liable for your damages.
ADR models are spreading and may vastly improve the legal landscape, but they also necessitate a shift in medical culture. Patients may receive smaller  payouts than they would in the traditional adversarial legal system at trial. However, they may also get compensated more efficiently, by reducing the cost of proceeding through lengthy litigation and trial.  In addition, patients in this model may feel that they have more honest interactions with their care providers (Kass and Ross 2016).

A personal example - I had a physician try to talk me in to ECT several years ago. I explained that I didn't want to do it, because I didn't want to accept the risks of permanent memory loss. He denied those risks at first. He told me it was cooked up by the scientologists and anti-psychiatry folks and assumed my resistance was due to having seen the movie One Flew Over a Cuckoos Nest (which I had not seen, by the way). I finally got him to concede it was a risk, a risk I wasn't willing to take. I don't care how small the risk is or if the physician thinks it's worth it. They better tell me the truth. He wasn't the one having the procedure and accepting those risks. I was. As long as I am legally competent, the decision is mine. I have real issues about trying to coerce someone into signing an informed consent document by lying. That's unethical. I continue to be glad I didn't do it. It's a very individual decision.
Emotionally fragile patients. If a doctor knows that the patient is so distressed that he or she will refuse needed treatment, the doctor may not be required to get the patient's informed consent. For example, if a brain tumor is life threatening, but removal entails frightening risks like paralysis, it may be appropriate for the doctor to be vague in her description of the risks.

An injury was caused by the negligence - For a medical malpractice claim to be valid, it is not sufficient that a health care professional simply violated the standard of care. The patient must also prove he or she sustained an injury that would not have occurred in the absence of negligence. An unfavorable outcome by itself is not malpractice. The patient must prove that the negligence caused the injury. If there is an injury without negligence or negligence that did not cause an injury, there is no case.
Medical malpractice claims don't only cover errors in diagnosis and treatment. Once you've established a doctor-patient relationship, the doctor owes you a duty of care and treatment with the degree of skill, care, and diligence as possessed by, or expected of, a reasonably competent physician under the same or similar circumstances. Part of that duty of care is to be forthcoming with your diagnosis, treatment options and prognosis, as reasonably competent physicians would not lie to their patients.
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