A patient who did not have his or her wounds dressed or treated properly and later develops an infection may decide to sue. If an anesthesiologist or other employee gives the patient a drug that he or she should have known would cause issues, the patient may pursue a medical malpractice claim. A common cause for a medical malpractice claim is when the patient was misdiagnosed or had a delayed diagnosis due to a mistake.

In California, for example, recovery for non-economic damages are limited to $250,000. According to the Supreme Court of California, "noneconomic damages compensate the plaintiff for 'pain, suffering, inconvenience, physical impairment, disfigurement and other nonpecuniary damage [as per Cal.Civ.Code section 3333.2, subdivision (a)].' Section 1431.2, subdivision (b)(2) similarly defines noneconomic damages as 'subjective, non-monetary losses including, but not limited to, pain, suffering, inconvenience, mental suffering, emotional distress, loss of society and companionship, loss of consortium, injury to reputation and humiliation.'”[41] Tort reform supporters argue that states have enacted such laws in order to keep health care costs low, in addition to helping curb medical malpractice litigation. However, according to the Supreme Court of California, the state's non-economic damages caps are "not a legislative attempt to estimate the true damages suffered by plaintiffs, but rather an attempt to control and reduce medical malpractice insurance costs by placing a predictable, uniform limit on the defendant's liability for noneconomic damages."[42]
Membership fees paid to the CMPA give physicians insurance coverage and a right to representation in medical malpractice lawsuits.  However, provincial governments reimburse physicians for at least a portion of their membership fees.  These arrangements are not generally made public.  However, a recently released Memorandum of Understanding between the Ministry of Health, the Ontario Medical Association, and the CMPA reveals that physicians are currently reimbursed for about 83 percent of their membership fees.[7]  It has been reported that the Ontario government paid about Can$112 million to reimburse physicians for medical malpractice fees in 2008.[8]  Government officials in Ontario have explained that the purpose of the reimbursement program is to encourage physicians to practice in the province and not to move to another province or the United States where average incomes may be higher.  Critics contend that because the CMPA’s fees are not based upon a physician’s record, the system does little to penalize physicians who are found to be liable for malpractice even on multiple occasions.[9]  Physicians who have committed acts of malpractice may, however, be disciplined by their provincial licensing body.  Discipline can range from suspensions to losses of the privilege to continue practicing medicine.
The staff members at Zinda Law Group genuinely care about the best interests of their clients and commit 100% of their energy to fight for the damages their clients deserve. Because Zinda Law Group works on a contingency fee- if you don't receive compensation from the case, neither do they. Give the firm a call today to begin taking aggressive action against the doctor or hospital behind your medical malpractice experience.
A difficult part of any doctor's job is analyzing a set of symptoms, and diagnosing the injury or illness which caused these symptoms to occur. In many cases, similar symptoms can actually be caused by various illnesses. A misdiagnosis of the underlying symptoms can result in the wrong treatment by the medical professional. For example, a common form of medical misdiagnosis is related to a heart attack diagnosis, or commonly referred to as coronary artery disease. CAD is a medical condition that may not show symptoms for years, but can result in a massive heart attack and death. Often, the first sign of an impending heart attack will be chest pains, which can be misdiagnosed as strained muscles.
As an analysis of the bill from Texas’ Senate Research Center notes, the “wrongful birth” cause of action was originally recognized in 1975 by the Texas Supreme Court, which ruled in favor of the parents of a child with disabilities in Jacobs v. Theimer. The doctor did not inform the plaintiff that she had contracted rubella, which is known to cause “severe birth defects in infants.”
I see why malpractice insurance is high. I think in many cases it's the attitude that goes along with the malpractice that leads to legal action being taken. I understand that that's not always the case, and sometimes it is simply an accident. However, I know in my family's situation had there been even a tiny morsel of remorse by the physician who treated my grandfather he wouldn't have had to travel to the state capitol. Misreading the fuzzy xray may have been an accident, but sending my grandfather home unable to walk or care for himself, in terrible pain with no pain medication for his broken hip was not an accident. We didn't profit from it, but the physician did have to get an attorney/attorneys when he faced the medical board - so you can blame people like him for the increase in your rates. Had he said he was sorry and not been such an a-- to my grandfather he wouldn't have had to go try to defend himself. He lost, by the way. Had to pay a fine and take some classes. He probably deserved more than he got, but it was something.
Medication and prescription drug negligence usually occurs in either of two ways. First, a doctor prescribes a patient a drug that causes injury because of a dosage error, misdiagnosis of symptoms, or a failure to check for an allergic reaction. Second, a pharmacist fills a prescription incorrectly that causes an injury to the patient. If you have sustained an injury due to the negligent acts of a doctor or pharmacist in relation to your medication, then you could have a valid medical negligence claim.
Another motivating factor: A quick, honest “apology” might prevent a future claim, or provide an opportunity for a settlement without the need for litigation. Insurance companies typically want to settle with an injured person directly if they can, and this allows them to do so before the full extent of injuries are known, as well as preventing the injured person from hiring an attorney who could increase the settlement value of the claim through their representation.

Various studies have shown that the Texas tort-reform law has had no effect on healthcare costs or the number of physicians practicing in the state.[45] A February 2014 study found "no evidence to support" the claim that "there had been a dramatic increase in physicians moving to Texas due to the improved liability climate."[47] The study found that this is true "for all patient care physicians in Texas, high-malpractice-risk specialties, primary care physicians, and rural physicians.[47]

Unfortunately, just because one of these things occurs does not mean you have a claim. Medicine is not an exact science, and the law does not obligate doctors to be error-free 100 percent of the time. If doctor error occurs but there is no breach of a standard of care, you may not have a strong claim. If however, doctor error occurs and there is a breach of a standard of care, then malpractice may have occurred.

One of the most common reasons that a physician may be accused of medical malpractice is due to the failure to diagnose. This is premised on the idea that the patient needlessly suffered for an extended period of time because the doctor failed to properly evaluate tests or run tests that should have reasonably notified him or her of the potential diagnosis. Other examples of medical malpractice include misdiagnosing a medical condition, failing to provide appropriate treatment, causing an unreasonable delay in treating a diagnosed condition, violating HIPAA laws, performing wrong-site surgery and performing surgery on the wrong patient.
The Court has found that somewhat different rules may apply to Congressional efforts to subject the states to suit in the domain of federal bankruptcy law. In Central Virginia Community College v. Katz, the Court held that state sovereign immunity was not implicated by the exercise of in rem jurisdiction by bankruptcy courts in voiding a preferential transfer to a state. Justice Stevens, writing for a majority of five (including Justice O'Connor, in one of her last cases before retirement, and Justices Souter, Ginsburg, and Breyer), referred to the rationale of an earlier bankruptcy decision, but relied more broadly on the nature of the bankruptcy power vested in Congress under Article I. "The question", he stated, "[was] not whether Congress could 'abrogate' state sovereign immunity in the Bankruptcy Act (as Congress had attempted to do); rather, because the history and justification of the Bankruptcy Clause, as well as legislation enacted immediately following ratification, demonstrate that [the Bankruptcy Clause] was intended not just as a grant of legislative authority to Congress, but also to authorize limited subordination of state sovereign immunity in the bankruptcy arena." In reaching this conclusion, he acknowledged that the Court's decision in Seminole Tribe and succeeding cases had assumed that those holdings would apply to the Bankruptcy Clause, but stated that the Court was convinced by "[c]areful study and reflection" that "that assumption was erroneous". The Court then crystallized the current rule: when Congressional legislation regulates matters that implicate "a core aspect of the administration of bankrupt estates", sovereign immunity is no longer available to the States if the statute subjects them to private suits.
The medical community, however, continued to fight for widespread tort reform among the states, and at the national level. They cited insurance increases in the late 1990s and early 2000s, which put further pressure on doctors' and hospitals' earnings—earnings that had been shrinking under Managed Care. Some areas of medicine were particularly hard hit. In New York and Florida, for example, obstetricians, gynecologists, and surgeons—the doctors who are sued the most frequently—pay more than $100,000 a year for $1 million in coverage.
Asking about action against licensure and malpractice history - in Mass, this is public information if you look it up on state web site. Even if it is not public info, it is still a relevant question. I'd MUCH rather have a doc explain briefly (without violating his/her own or other patients' privacy) what went wrong and how it has been corrected, than to have an MD who lies.
The patient must also prove that the doctor's negligent misdiagnosis or delayed diagnosis caused the patient's injury or condition to progress beyond where it normally would have -- had the correct diagnose been made in a timely manner -- and that this progression had a negative impact upon treatment. For example, because of a delayed cancer diagnosis the patient had to undergo a more severe treatment regimen (such as chemotherapy) or the patient died because the cancer had metastasized and no longer responded to treatment. Sometimes a patient can show harm even if the condition can still be treated. For example, with some cancers a delay in treatment increases the risk of recurrence.
Canadian physicians who are in private practice or work for hospitals are required to obtain medical liability insurance.  Such insurance is available through the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA).  Insurance premiums or “membership fees” are based upon the type of work a physician performs and the region in which he or she practices.  The three fee regions are Quebec, Ontario, and the Rest of Canada.  The CMPA has published Fee Schedules.[6]  Fees are not based upon a physician’s record and are not increased for a history of complaints or on account of claims paid.
No matter your jurisdiction, medical malpractice claims and lawsuits are primarily about one thing: accountability. People trust that doctors will take care of them and make their condition better in a patient’s hour of need. When doctors fail in that responsibility, they must be held accountable for the negligent actions they took – as well as for the actions that they failed to take under the circumstances.

Doctor Liability, Damages – In this category of cases the patient can prove that the doctor was negligent, and that negligence was the cause of the patient’s injury.  These are the situations most likely to end favorably for the injured party.  Attorneys are more likely to take cases they believe will be easy to prove.  When attorneys can easily prove physician liability, costs are lower and the client will receive more of the damage award.  In other words, less money will be deducted from the patient’s award.


Our attorneys have a strong record of succeeding in serious personal injury cases in which the negligent party is an agent of the government. In fact, our firm obtained two of the largest Federal Tort Claims Act verdicts in United States history: Dickerson v. U.S., a medical malpractice birth injury case in which our clients received $15.75 million, and Lebron v. U.S., another medical malpractice birth injury case in which our clients received $18.96 million.

A study by RAND Corp. researchers published in October 2014 in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that laws restricting medical-malpractice suits do not reduce the amount of "defensive medicine" or reduce health-care costs. The researchers, led by Daniel A. Waxman, examined 3.8 million Medicare patient records from hospital emergency departments from 1997 to 2011, comparing care in three states that enacted strict malpractice reform laws about a decade earlier (Georgia, Texas and South Carolina) to care in neighboring states that did not enact such laws. The study found that the laws had no effect on whether doctors ordered resource-intensive care (e.g., CT or MRI scans and hospitalization).[55][56][57]


A no-fault system may provide compensation to people who have medical outcomes that are significantly worse than would be anticipated under the circumstances,[11] or where there is proof of injury resulting from medical error,[12] without regard to whether or not malpractice occurred. Some no fault systems are restricted to specific types of injury, such as a birth injury or vaccine injury.[13]
Disclaimer: Call247Legal.com ("Site") is not a lawyer referral service nor is it a substitute for hiring an attorney or law firm. The Site is owned and operated by 24/7 Legal ("24/7 Legal"). As such, 24/7 Legal offers no legal advice, recommendations, mediation or counseling in connection with any legal matter, under any circumstances, and nothing we do and no element of the Site or the 24/7 Legal call connect functionality ("Call Service") should be construed as such. Some of the third party attorneys, law firms and legal service providers (collectively, "Third Party Legal Professionals") are accessible via the Call Service by virtue of their payment of a fee to promote their respective services to users of the Call Service. 24/7 Legal does not endorse or recommend any participating Third Party Legal Professionals. 24/7 Legal does not make any representation as to, and has not made any judgment concerning the qualifications, expertise or credentials of, any participating Third Party Legal Professional. Any use of the Call Service by you is not intended to, and will not create, an attorney-client relationship between you and 24/7 Legal or any of the Third Party Legal Professionals. Without limiting the foregoing, any information submitted to 24/7 Legal and/or any electronic or other communication sent to 24/7 Legal will not create an attorney-client relationship between you and 24/7 Legal or any of the Third Party Legal Professionals. The content found on the Site contains only general information on legal issues, and while we strive to keep the information accurate and up-to-date, we cannot guarantee that all of the information is completely accurate or current. Laws vary across legal jurisdictions and may be subject to interpretation by different courts. Laws are also very specific to individual facts and circumstances, and the general information found on the Site may not fit your particular circumstances.
In the wake of a medical malpractice accident, you should hire a personal injury attorney so he/she can determine if somebody negligently provided medical care to you and who can determine what injuries were caused as a result. If a personal injury attorney determines that medical malpractice did occur, a lawsuit can be filed. One of the most important things that you can do is to take pictures of any things that don't look right- such as cuts or abrasions. You can also gather all hospital records, request more medical documentation from a hospital and research a doctor's medical track record. Keep a journal to record the medical malpractice incident, your injuries and follow-up care.
Various studies have shown that the Texas tort-reform law has had no effect on healthcare costs or the number of physicians practicing in the state.[45] A February 2014 study found "no evidence to support" the claim that "there had been a dramatic increase in physicians moving to Texas due to the improved liability climate."[47] The study found that this is true "for all patient care physicians in Texas, high-malpractice-risk specialties, primary care physicians, and rural physicians.[47]
Litigants who seek to bring claims against federal officials for abuses of their authority have been confused concerning the proper way to characterize their actions in the pleadings. Generally speaking, how one drafts a complaint and not what evidence is to be introduced determines whether a claim can survive as a federal cause of action. Tully v. Mott Supermarkets, Inc., 337 F.Supp. 834, 844 D.N.J. (1972).
There is a statute of limitations (or time limit in which you can file a lawsuit) for medical malpractice cases. This limit varies from state to state, but in general it is about two years from when the injury occurred. To ensure you file a claim before the statute of limitations is up, you should reach out to a medical malpractice attorney as soon after you realize doctor error occurred.

Medical malpractice lawyers generally offer free initial consultations. Most rely on contingency fees, meaning that the patient never pays the lawyer. If the lawyer wins the case, the law firm takes a portion (usually about 1/3) of the award. If the lawyer loses the case, the lawyer usually is not paid, though the client may be on the hook for a few small costs.


The majority of the American public supports reforms to the malpractice system. However, surveys show that the majority of the American public also vastly underestimate the extent of medical errors.[34] Recent research has shown that while both health consumers and health producers are concerned about some of the adverse consequences of healthcare litigation, health consumers perceive that increased healthcare litigation can reduce the incentives for negligence on the part of healthcare providers.[35]
If you are considering a medical negligence claim and you are thinking of contacting Been Let Down to discuss your claim, we would first arrange a consultation over the telephone; this initial call is free, and there is no obligation to proceed. During this phase of the claims process, we will take the time to listen to the details of your claim in detail.
Seek out an appropriate specialist who can treat your specific injury.  Give the doctor your full medical history, including the circumstances surrounding the recent medical error.  Remember that medical records are the most important factors when determining a doctor’s error.  Make sure you give the new doctor enough correct and thorough information to ensure that the charts accurately record your state of health following the medical error.  To make sure your doctor fully understands your present condition and that these facts are properly recorded, be sure to share the “complete picture” by explaining what your health was like before, during, and after the accident, as well as your current condition.  Make sure your new doctor has access to any medical records that may impact his/her diagnosis and plan for treatment.
However, an attorney may be able to help you file a law suit against the negligent physician.  When seeking your legal expert, the single most important factor is the attorney’s reputation.  If you hire an attorney that is notorious for settling claims for less than they’re worth, you are less likely to receive the money you deserve.  For more information on attorneys and the legal processes involved in medical malpractice law suits, please read our article Medical Malpractice and the Legal Process
3. Evidence - keep track of any evidence which could be relevant to your case. Keep detailed records of your appointments with your GP, together with records of any telephone consultations and referral appointments. Your solicitor will arrange to obtain and copy of your medical notes and x-rays. You will have to pass this information on to your lawyer and it will be a lot easier if you have it at hand. Keep any prescriptions, receipts from further treatments, notes of further treatment and a diary detailing the progression of your health issues. For example, if you fell ill with appendicitis and your GP failed to diagnose it, you should keep a note of the progression of your condition, if you are well enough to do so. All of this is not vital, but very helpful.  
A number of states hold the hospital responsible if it gives staff privileges to an incompetent or dangerous doctor, even if the doctor is an independent contractor. The hospital is also responsible if it should have known that a previously safe doctor had become incompetent or dangerous. For example, if a doctor becomes severely addicted to drugs and the hospital management knew about it, or it was so obvious they should have known about it, a patient injured by that doctor can probably sue the hospital.
When the provincial health insurance plans were first created in the 1960’s and 1970’s, the federal government paid for about half of the provincial plans’ costs.  This percentage fell by more than half in the 1990’s, but has gone back up somewhat in recent years.[4]  The provincial contributions to the plans are also mostly from general revenues.  However, the largest province, Ontario, and a couple of other provinces also impose a levy on employers to help pay for their programs.
This means that if an employee or other individual under the direction of the employer acted in a negligent manner, the employer is responsible for the injuries that resulted. Generally, nurses, medical technicians and paramedics are the direct employees of the hospital. If the hospital employee was performing a job-related function when the patient was injured, the patient can usually sue the hospital for the employee’s mistake.
While some diagnostic errors may be seen as reasonable, patient harm that stems from inadequate communication could be the result of negligence on the part of medical providers. Every case is different, and the strength of yours is in the details. To have those details reviewed by an experienced medical malpractice lawyer, contact The Tinker Law Firm, PLLC. Call us today or fill out our online contact form for a free claim evaluation.
We offer a completely free, no obligation Medical Negligence Claim Assessment. We understand that suing your GP may not be an easy decision so we are here to help and advise you. We will take the time to listen to your complaint, and then explain whether you can sue a doctor, how long it might take, how you can fund the claim and how much compensation you might receive.
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In the vast majority of cases, the Doctor who takes on your care will do so in a highly professional manner, but there may be occasions when their standards fall short of acceptable. If it can be shown your Doctor failed in their duty of care, in a manner tantamount to negligence, and that you suffered some form of loss, damage, or pain as a result, you may have cause to pursue a claim for medical negligence.
In Hans v. Louisiana, the Supreme Court of the United States held that the Eleventh Amendment re-affirms that states possess sovereign immunity and are therefore immune from being sued in federal court without their consent. In later cases, the Supreme Court has strengthened state sovereign immunity considerably. In Blatchford v. Native Village of Noatak, the court explained that
At the same time, the doctor or the doctor’s insurer must complete a similar investigation in order to determine whether medical negligence actually occurred, and if so, whether the negligence resulted in certain injuries and damages to the claimant. The doctor must also obtain an opinion in writing from another doctor in order to support his or her defense.
In the vast majority of cases, establishing the answer to this question requires testimony from an expert medical witness. The patient (usually through an attorney) consults a doctor who specializes in the relevant field, and the doctor offers an opinion as to the proper procedures to follow when deciding whether to terminate care in cases like the patient's -- and if the proper decision is to end care, the expert will also set out the appropriate way to go about ending the doctor-patient relationship under the circumstances.

After a doctor has diagnosed a patients' illness or injury, treatment should be administered in a timely manner to give the patient the best possible chance of recovery. If a doctor fails to treat the patient quickly enough, then negligence has possibly occurred. Often, this form of medical negligence takes place in an emergency room, where timely medical treatment could mean the difference between life and death. Another example relates to birth injury cases. In a case of fetal distress, doctors have to act quickly and perform a c-section to remove a baby before permanent injury occurs to the fetal brain. With many cases, the failure to perform a C-section in a timely manner has resulted in permanent brain injury, or cerebral palsy in a new born baby.


At some point, the hospital might make an offer to settle the case. So, it is important for the patient to determine the value of the case. The patient should consider all possible losses and harm stemming from the malpractice, including, past and future medical expenses, past and future wage losses, pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment of life (the decreased value of a person’s life as a result of the injury, measured by changes in lifestyle, such as the loss of the ability to enjoy sports, walk or play with children), and loss of consortium (losses to family members as a result of the injury, measured by loss of companionship or the loss of the ability to engage in certain activities).
You must make your claim against the correct person or entity. In some cases, you would sue the doctor directly, but in other cases you might sue the hospital or health care system. In Washington, D.C. you have three years from the date of injury to file a medical malpractice lawsuit. You must make sure that you take action immediately when you have been injured at the hands of a trusted physician or another medical care provider.
The principle was not mentioned in the original United States Constitution. The courts have recognized it both as a principle that was inherited from English common law, and as a practical, logical inference (that the government cannot be compelled by the courts because it is the power of the government that creates the courts in the first place).[10]
A study by RAND Corp. researchers published in October 2014 in the New England Journal of Medicine concluded that laws restricting medical-malpractice suits do not reduce the amount of "defensive medicine" or reduce health-care costs. The researchers, led by Daniel A. Waxman, examined 3.8 million Medicare patient records from hospital emergency departments from 1997 to 2011, comparing care in three states that enacted strict malpractice reform laws about a decade earlier (Georgia, Texas and South Carolina) to care in neighboring states that did not enact such laws. The study found that the laws had no effect on whether doctors ordered resource-intensive care (e.g., CT or MRI scans and hospitalization).[55][56][57]

People have a tendency to downplay their injuries because they do not want to be seen by others as complaining or needy. In fact, those that are more severely injured tend to downplay their injuries the most. Before you are convinced that your injuries don’t warrant some type of compensation, it is best to be examined by an independent medical expert. You may be entitled to lost wages, medical expenses, or compensation for pain and suffering.
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