The philosophy of our law firm regarding damages is simple: obtain the maximum monetary recovery possible for each client. We accomplish this by relying on our decades of experience to diligently prepare our cases for trial and aggressively advocate for our clients. Our financial resources, technological tools and access to outstanding experts in various fields allow us to provide top-notch representation to our clients.
Even if one manages to get a court to take jurisdiction, enforcing a judgment may be nearly impossible. If the judgment is obtained in America, enforcing the judgment in a foreign nation may require filing an entirely new lawsuit to domesticate the judgment, which could take nearly as long as pursuing the case in that country in the first place. If the judgment is domestic, or if the nation agrees to domesticate the judgment of a US court, foreign laws regarding collection of judgments usually differ greatly from American laws and may interfere with seizing or levying on assets and accounts. 

In the course of medical treatment, mistakes can be made that can further damage your health — or lead to new issues altogether. When these situations are caused by the medical negligence of health care providers, it is important that they are held accountable — not just so that those affected can be compensated, but so that the negligence is not repeated.
Please note that we cannot guarantee the results or outcome of your particular procedure. For instance, the government may reject a trademark application for legal reasons beyond the scope of LegalZoom's service. In some cases, a government backlog can lead to long delays before your process is complete. Similarly, LegalZoom does not guarantee the results or outcomes of the services rendered by our legal plan attorneys or attorney-assisted products. Problems like these are beyond our control and are not covered by this guarantee.
At some point, the hospital might make an offer to settle the case. So, it is important for the patient to determine the value of the case. The patient should consider all possible losses and harm stemming from the malpractice, including, past and future medical expenses, past and future wage losses, pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment of life (the decreased value of a person’s life as a result of the injury, measured by changes in lifestyle, such as the loss of the ability to enjoy sports, walk or play with children), and loss of consortium (losses to family members as a result of the injury, measured by loss of companionship or the loss of the ability to engage in certain activities).
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If the prosecution and defense cannot agree on a settlement, the case will proceed to trial. Medical malpractice trials are almost always trials by jury. If a case does proceed to trial, and the losing party is unwilling to accept the jury’s verdict, they can appeal to a higher court. In some jurisdictions, they can also appeal the amount of a judgement in the same court.
Despite this, the perception of “lawsuits gone wild” exists. As a result, many states have imposed substantial limits on damage awards in medical-malpractice claims. These award limits typically have the greatest impact on patients who are most gravely hurt—those with catastrophic injuries and a lifetime of future medical needs. And patients who are denied justice in the courts must rely on health insurance and, in many instances, such public programs as Medicare or Medicaid to pay their future medical bills—leaving the cost of medical malpractice to the public instead of the responsible party.
Canada has a single-payer health insurance scheme that covers virtually all residents.  Most physicians are in private practice and they bill the insurance plans for their services.  Being in private practice, they require medical liability insurance.  This is usually obtained through a professional organization.  However, physicians are reimbursed for a large portion of their insurance premiums by provincial governments.  Fees are lower than in the United States for a number of reasons.  Two of these are that Canada’s highest courts have set limits on awards and the country’s liability laws make establishing professional negligence more difficult.  Another is that the physicians’ insurance company defends lawsuits very vigorously.
on a regular basis. Prescribe toxic drugs to children, teens, adults and the elderly, drugs known to create psychosis, anxiety, akathisia, abnormal thoughts, suicidal and homicidal thoughts. Drugs causing diabetes, tardive akathisia, metabolic syndrome, heart attacks... And they prescribe them in cocktail poly drugging format. Some of the real lunatics in this fake area also brain damage their victims with ECT.
Medical malpractice claims don’t settle easily out of court. Doctors are usually outraged at being sued. Some believe they can do no wrong. In any event, they don’t want to admit any wrongdoing, and to them, settling is just that, an admission that they did wrong. Therefore, more than with any other type of case, your lawyer must be prepared to try your case. Yet statistically, medical malpractice claims are among the most difficult claims to win at trial. Most of them are lost. Your best chance at settling, or if you can’t settle, winning at trial, is with an experienced medical malpractice trial attorney whose reputation might induce a favorable settlement or, that failing, whose trial skills and medical knowledge will tip the scales in your favor at trial. The medical malpractice team at Michaels & Smolak is skilled and experienced in such claims, so contact us for a free consultation now.

For example, if your knee didn’t heal properly after surgery, but the doctor performed the surgery according to standards of care, he may not have committed medical malpractice. But if you developed shooting pain in your knee after surgery and a follow-up revealed a severed ligament, and the doctor didn’t tell you about it, that may be malpractice.
If you think you’ve been a victim of medical negligence at a hospital, you should speak to a lawyer as soon as possible. The statute of limitations, or the legal timeframe in which one can bring a medical negligence suit, begins once the injury is known or should have been known. The Florida statute of limitations for medical malpractice claims is generally 2 years-absent some exceptions that can extend the period up to 4 years or 8 years for infants.
Jason Konvicka: Medical malpractice occurs when a health-care provider deviates from the recognized “standard of care” in the treatment of a patient. The “standard of care” is defined as what a reasonably prudent medical provider would or would not have done under the same or similar circumstances. In essence, it boils down to whether the provider was negligent.

Doctor Liability, Damages Are Small – Some states have enacted tort reforms that apply caps to the amount of money an injured patient can recover from a medical malpractice claim.  Under these caps, a patient may only be entitled to a $250,000 verdict.  While this amount of money may seem large, the patient must share that money with expert witnesses, investigators, and attorneys.  In the end, the patient’s financial recovery may be slight.  Attorneys may hesitate to take a case if it seems like the recovery will be negligible.  However, some patients are more concerned with filing suit as a matter of principle than as a means of financial recovery.  Sometimes lawyers are willing to take a case to help the client make such a statement.
An individual can be considered negligent by committing an act that causes harm or by failing to do something to prevent harm. An individual’s actions are judged against a hypothetical standard known as the “reasonably prudent person” standard. For example, a lawyer who must decide whether a nurse practitioner was negligent by failing to use a sterile needle when taking a patient’s blood would apply the standard by asking: “What would a reasonably prudent nurse practitioner have done in the same situation?”
A medical malpractice action must be commenced within one year after the cause of action accrues. However, if, at the time the injury occurs, the claimant is a minor or of unsound mind, the one-year statutes are tolled until the disability is removed (the minor reaches 18) Ohio Rev. Code Ann. § 2305.16. However, with the passage of time it can be more difficult to pursue the case as memories can fade or witnesses may have moved away. We recommend contacting our office right away for a free consultation to make sure you understand all of your rights and to have all of your questions answered.
Usually these cases are handled as civil matters, because the doctor lacked the requisite intent or did not act in a completely wanton and reckless manner. Additionally, the doctor may face disciplinary proceedings against his or her license, and could be fire by any institution for which he or she works. This could result in an enormous judgment against the doctor, loss of a professional license, and unemployment. The loss of a patient is not likely to be handled lightly, even though it may only result in civil penalties.
Many litigants facing civil lawsuits in which the United States is the plaintiff have erroneously sought to counterclaim against the U.S. The United States, however, to this date has not waived sovereign immunity for claims for damages, (See United States v. Northside Realty Associates, 324 F.Supp. 287, 291 (N.D. GA 1971) (dismissing a counterclaim asserted against the Attorney General where plaintiff in the suit was the United States on the ground that although the suit was initiated by the Attorney General, the real party in interest was the United States).

dear carol i know its not much to offer in this situation but i can give you infromation that might help your son first of all have you consired he is having side effcets to the new medication make sure you geg name of it also i suggest you had to pandasnetwork. org it not what you think it talk about an autoimmune condtion that cause many syptoms like you say also if are heading to a solictor maybe talk your son into getting a chromosome test if possible because if they belive adhd is caused by improper chromosome numbers they should of least told you about it hang in there its such a shame what those pschyrtist do they like vlutrues they prey on weak till they dead,thats an offense to vlutures least the ARE HONEST hope info help
^ C & L Enters., Inc. v. Citizen Band, Potawatomi Indian Tribe of Okla., 532 U.S. 411 (2001); Kiowa Tribe of Okla. v. Mfg. Techs., Inc., 523 U.S. 751 (1998); Okla. Tax Comm'n v. Citizen Band, Potawatomi Indian Tribe of Okla., 498 U.S. 505 (1991); Santa Clara Pueblo v. Martinez, 436 U.S. 49 (1978); Puyallup Tribe, Inc. v. Dep't of Game of State of Wash., 433 U.S. 165 (1977); United States v. U.S. Fidelity & Guar. Co., 309 U.S. 506 (1940); Turner v. United States, 248 U.S. 354 (1919). See also Oneida Indian Nation of N.Y. v. Madison Cnty., 605 F.3d 149, 156 (2d Cir. 2010), cert. granted, 131 S. Ct. 459, vacated and remanded, 131 S. Ct. 704 (2011) (per curiam).
If you don't find any relevant information, leverage the information you have with an online search. Place quotation marks around the doctor's name to keep the phrase intact (such as "Dr. John Smith") and follow this with such keywords as "malpractice," "lawsuit," "sanction," "complaint," or "suspension." Start by using only one keyword at a time; this better filters the results. You can use more as you widen your search

Another common form of physician negligence is surgical error. Like all types of medical malpractice, surgical error is dependent upon the standard of care. But unlike in diagnostic error cases, common surgical errors are often very easy to identify. Amputating the wrong leg, leaving surgical instruments inside a patient’s body, performing the wrong procedure, or performing a procedure without informed consent -- these types of errors constitute physician negligence and are often very east to spot. If your surgeon breached the standard of care and caused you harm, your surgeon was likely negligent.


Medical malpractice occurs when a patient is harmed by a doctor (or other medical professional) who fails to competently perform his or her medical duties. The rules about medical malpractice -- from when you must bring your lawsuit to whether you must notify the doctor ahead of time -- vary from state to state. But there are some general principals and broad categories of rules that apply to most medical malpractice cases. Here's an overview of the law and some of these special rules.
Lets make it psychiatric: A psychiatrist recommends lamotrigine and warns of the risk of fatal skin rash. The patient asks the psychiatrist whether any of her patients has suicided. She lies and says no. The patient sloughs her skin, almost dies, discovers the lie and sues. She says if she had know the doctor has lost a patient to suicide she would have found another psychiatrist.

Under Ohio law, a medical malpractice lawsuit must be filed within one year from the later of one of two dates. This is known as the statute of limitations. Those dates are (1) when you discover the injury or (2) from the last date of treatment with the negligent medical provider. There are exceptions to this rule. Therefore, if you think you or a loved one has suffered due to medical malpractice it is imperative that you contact us at your earliest possible convenience so that we can provide you with an opinion as to whether or not you have a potential medical negligence claim. If a loved one has passed away due to medical negligence the family has a separate claim known as a wrongful death lawsuit. This is subject to a two year statute of limitations from the date of death.
Most medical procedures or treatments involve some risk. It is the doctor's responsibility to give the patient information about a particular treatment or procedure so the patient can decide whether to undergo the treatment, procedure, or test. This process of providing essential information to the patient and getting the patient's agreement to a certain medical procedure or treatment is called informed consent.
People have a tendency to downplay their injuries because they do not want to be seen by others as complaining or needy. In fact, those that are more severely injured tend to downplay their injuries the most. Before you are convinced that your injuries don’t warrant some type of compensation, it is best to be examined by an independent medical expert. You may be entitled to lost wages, medical expenses, or compensation for pain and suffering.
Regardless of how much you want to be the one selected to do the procedure, that's the patient's choice not yours. I think it's smart to look into a physician's background before selecting them to do surgery. I would want to know how much experience you have or if there had been malpractice issues. Patients are the ones paying and taking the risks. They get to decide how much risk they're willing to take -not the physician. If you refuse to answer the questions, which I do believe is your right, then it lets the patient decide what to do next - either get on the medical board website and see if anything has been reported, talk to more people, find another physician who doesn't mind answering the questions, etc.
Asking about action against licensure and malpractice history - in Mass, this is public information if you look it up on state web site. Even if it is not public info, it is still a relevant question. I'd MUCH rather have a doc explain briefly (without violating his/her own or other patients' privacy) what went wrong and how it has been corrected, than to have an MD who lies.
It isn’t surprising that you like your doctor. Otherwise, why else would you keep going back to him year after year? But so what? Liking your doctor shouldn’t keep you from suing him if he has caused you emotional and/or physical harm. Think about it – the legal system is around for a reason. It’s there to provide people with a way to receive compensation from someone who has harmed.
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